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Stand in London Denounces Bahrain’s Disregard for Detainees’ Lives

Bahraini activists organized a stand in London condemning the murder of political prisoner Abbas MalAllah due to medical negligence in Bahrain’s prisons.

In front of the Bahrain embassy in Britain, protesters displayed pictures of the victim and banners denouncing the Bahraini authorities’ persecution.

They denounced the regime’s ongoing crimes against prisoners of opinion and expression in the Kingdom, especially its deliberate medical negligence policy.

On Tuesday, the 50-year-old political prisoner, Abbas MalAllah, joined the victims’ list due to the absence of medical care and the brutal torture that has continued for many years inside regime’s prisons.

The Bahrain Center for Human Rights stated that the detainee Abbas Hasan MalAllah, 50 years old, became the 48th victim in Bahrain’s prisons.

In the same context, Bahraini scholars held the Khilafiyya regime responsible for the disregard for detainees’ lives.

In a joint statement, scholars stressed their condemnation of all crimes committed by the regime against the detainee MalAllah.

“From the brutal torture to the fact that he was taken to court on the road to his inability to walk, due to the severity of torture, to medical neglect.”

Scholars also condemned all forms of abusive practices against prisoners of political opinion and a living conscience.

The scholars emphasized that the prisoners’ suffering, especially in terms of recklessness and health neglect, “is a crime against humanity and is never forgiven.”

They stressed, “All methods of disinformation practised by the authority have not succeeded in covering up this heinous crime.”

Scholars called “all those concerned to provide relief to prisoners of Bahrain threatened by this arrogant regime.

The statement warned, “This issue should be addressed before a disaster inside prisons takes place, which would explode the situation in the country and take it into the unknown.”

Human Rights First described the conditions of prisoners of conscience in Bahrain’s Jaw Prison as “notoriously appalling.”

This week, the continued outbreak of COVID in Jau sparked a wave of protest that could signify a turning point for Bahrainis’ human rights.

Human Rights First, formerly known as the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights, said that the central prison “The jail hosts a combustible mix of young men serving long sentences, many of whom have been tortured”. With an official capacity of 1,201, Jau prison is now conservatively estimated to be holding 2,700 inmates.

Based in New York City and Washington, DC, the human rights organization warned that prisoners are crammed into cells and complain of regular beatings by guards. Physical and psychological torture have long been systematic. It was no surprise in 2015 when a riot erupted in prison.

In street protests across the country, Bahrainis are decrying the dangers their incarcerated sons, husbands, and brothers face from a COVID outbreak at Jau prison. Protestors, primarily women, are demanding the release of their loved ones.

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